Waxy Maize: What It Is, Benefits and How to Take


Waxy Maize: What It Is, Benefits and How to Take / Supplements

The market for supplements is constantly expanding. New products are launched at a resounding frequency; it is difficult to choose which product best meets the demands of the consumer. There are so many brands, so many effects and so many products of misleading advertisements (which stifle many unwanted effects and flaws of your product), that in order not to take the risks of a bad purchase, you need to be aware of all the pros and cons of the coveted supplement .

Let's meet one of them, Waxy Maize. What it is, its composition, benefits and how to take are some of the topics to be evaluated so that the consumption of this supplement is conscious and with a lower probability of harmful effects to the body.

Which is

Waxy Maize is a carbohydrate-based supplement that is the best source of energy for the functions of the cells of the human body. Without carbohydrates, we can not effectively perform the day-to-day tasks. The raw material of this supplement is extracted from a type of corn starch that is grown in the United States, called waxy corn.

Waxy starch, a carbohydrate derived from both corn that is grown in the United States and from sources such as rice and barley, has as its main characteristic the large amount of a branched starch called amylopectin. This, in turn, is a highly branched polymer composed of glucose, in addition to being soluble in water.

Waxy starch consists of 70% amylopectin and 30% amylose, which has a low molecular weight compared to amylopectin. Only by analyzing the characteristics of these compounds present in the waxy maize starch can one come to the conclusion that this starch can be broken at several points at the same time, which makes its digestion something that requires less effort.

Thus, this starch is of excellent digestion, also possessing the high capacity to attract other nutrients that are difficult to assimilate, increasing their respective absorptions. In addition, the waxy starch present in Waxy Maize is zero sugar, does not retain water and is gluten-free, avoiding undesirable bumps. Even though it has a high molecular weight, the Waxy Maize supplement is low in osmosis, allowing it to be more easily absorbed into the bloodstream, bringing all the nutrients and fueling the muscles that have been weakened by physical exercise.

Benefits

Because of its easy breakdown in the body, the carbohydrates in Waxy Maize are very useful for those who follow a routine of intense physical exercises, charging the body more energy so that the workout is well done. People usually take this supplement after training, to restore glycogen levels (which are the stored form of carbohydrate in muscle tissues), very weakened during exercise. However, Waxy Maize can also be consumed before training because its absorption by the body is slow and this will cause the glycogen supply to be gradual; ideal for long-term exercise.

Some companies sell Waxy Maize on the grounds that it can be absorbed 70-80% faster than other post-workouts available in the market, such as dextrose and maltodextrin (below we will clarify the main differences between the three).

COMPLEMENTARY ARTICLES
  • Is Probiotic Whey Protein Good? What to Buy?
  • Maltodextrin - What It Is, What It Is Used For And How To Take It
  • Is Carnivor Mass Good? How It Works, Stories and How to Take
  • Dextrose - What It Is, What It Is Used For And How To Take It

Differences between Waxy Maize, Maltodextrin and Dextrose

There are 3 main types of carbohydrate supplements that are advisable for post workout: Waxy Maize, Maltodextrin and Dextrose.

Maltodextrin, in short, is a complex carbohydrate extracted from the enzymatic breakdown of molecules present in corn starch. It is absorbed slowly by the body and this contributes to the increase of insulin in the bloodstream. By increasing glucose levels in cells, Malto prevents muscle catabolism and decreases fatigue. It can be consumed before or after training and is able to provide energy for long-term exercise.

Dextrose, unlike Maltodextrin, is a simpler carbohydrate and has a reduced molecular structure, which facilitates its absorption. It can quickly raise glucose levels in the body, providing energy for the workouts and leading to insulin spikes. By this factor, the transport of nutrients and amino acids becomes faster, facilitating the recovery of muscle mass. Its consumption is indicated after the training, since it has fast absorption, preventing the body to use proteins to recover.

As already seen, Waxy Maize is digested and absorbed more slowly and does not cause insulin spikes as high as other supplements. Because it has a low glycemic index, it helps to lose weight, because the digestion of the carbohydrates becomes slower, being also slower the increase of sugar in the blood. This also helps maintain the feeling of satiety for longer.

How to take

The main indication of consumption of the Waxy Maize is to ingest it after the training, in an amount of 40g of the product dissolved in natural drink or shake. It is advisable to administer it along with other supplements, such as those that are high in protein, for example. It is not advisable to consume Waxy Maize with some other energy supplement, as this may overwhelm the body. 

Additional references:

  • Sean Nalewany J; COMPLETE WAXY MAIZE STARCH REVIEW: IS IT WORTH IT?
  • Anderson GH, Catherine NL, Woodend DM, Wolever TM. Inverse association between the effect of carbohydrates on blood glucose and subsequent short-term food intake in young men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Nov; 76 (5): 1023-30.
  • He J, Liu J, Zhang G. Slowly digestible waxy maize starch prepared by octenyl succinic anhydride esterification and heat-moisture treatment: glycemic response and mechanism. Biomacromolecules. 2008 Jan; 9 (1): 175-84.
  • Leiper JB, Aulin KP, S? Derlund K. Improved gastric emptying rate in humans of a unique glucose polymer with gel-forming properties. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2000 Nov; 35 (11): 1143-9.
  • Zhang G, Venkatachalam M, Hamaker BR.Structural basis for the slow digestion of native cereal starches. Biomacromolecules. 2006 Nov; 7 (11): 3259-66.

Have you tried Waxy Maize supplementation? Between him, maltodextrin and dextrose, which is your favorite and why? Comment below.